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Teton Two-Burner Stove

MODEL #: MS2
$74.99

Natural Herb Blend BBQ Pellets

MODEL #: PLNHB
$19.99

Browning Cast Iron Set

MODEL #: CBOXBR
$112.99

Cooler 50

MODEL #: C50
$299.99

Tailgater Combo

MODEL #: EX60LWTG
$239.99

Bamboo Cutting Board

MODEL #: CHOP26
$69.99

Competition Blend BBQ Pellets

MODEL #: PLCB
$19.99

Big Gas Grill Three-Burner Stove

MODEL #: SPG90B
$319.99

Pocket Puff Iron

MODEL #: SPP5
$24.99

Del Rio Fire Pit

MODEL #: FP29LG
$249.99

Cooler 70

MODEL #: C70
$349.99

SmokePro BBQ Sear Box

MODEL #: PGSEAR
$249.99

SmokePro Bottom Shelf Accessory

MODEL #: PGBS
$72.99

SmokePro DLX Pellet Grill

MODEL #: PG24
$699.99

Two-Burner Patio Cover

MODEL #: PC32
$27.49

Rainier Campers Combo

MODEL #: MS2GG
$124.99

Cherry BBQ Pellets

MODEL #: PLCY
$19.99

Scraper Cleaning Tool

MODEL #: PZS25
$10.49

Dutch Oven Bag 16"

MODEL #: CBDO16
$28.99

Lantern Carry Bag

MODEL #: CBMSL
$21.00

SmokePro Stainless DLX Pellet Grill

MODEL #: PG24S
$799.99

SmokePro DLX Pellet Grill Kit

MODEL #: PG24-KIT1
$819.85

SmokePro STX Pellet Grill

MODEL #: PG24STX
$583.33

XL Charcoal Lighter Basket

MODEL #: CLB12
$26.49

Sequoia Fire Pit

MODEL #: GCLOGM
$114.99

Browning 3X Three-Burner Stove

MODEL #: EX90LWB
$250.00

11" Square Skillet with Ribs

MODEL #: SK11R
$22.99

Orchard Apple BBQ Pellets

MODEL #: PLAP
$19.99

SmokePro Stainless DLX Pellet Grill Kit

MODEL #: PG24S-KIT1
$864.85

Monterey Patio Cover

MODEL #: PC40
$37.49

12" Disposable Dutch Oven Liners

MODEL #: AOL12
$4.99

Artisan Pizza Oven 90 Accessory

MODEL #: PZ90
$149.99

14" Cast Iron Ultimate Dutch Oven

MODEL #: UDO14
$99.99

Blog Results

  • How to Care for Your New Bamboo Cutting Board

    In case you haven’t heard, bamboo cutting boards are the next big kitchen accessory. Bamboo is a sustainable, fast-growing resource, and it is tougher than many woods on the market today. The grass (technically bamboo isn’t a wood) is also gentler with your knives and a real beauty on the counter top. Basically, it’s everything you’d want in a cutting board.

     

    At Camp Chef, we know a good kitchen tool when we see one. So we brought you the cutting board of all cutting boards—26 inches of solid bamboo. You can fit steaks, whole chicken, brisket, roast, and more on this board without breaking a sweat. It’s also perfect for transporting your prep station from the kitchen to the patio in one trip. Check it out; go ahead, we’ll wait.

     

    Now that we’ve taken care of that, you need to know how to care for your new bamboo cutting board, right?

     

    The bad news is that bamboo cutting boards need the same kind of TLC that traditional wooden cutting boards do; the good news is that they’ll last a lot longer than any other board if you treat them right.

     

    Bamboo cutting board with brisket

    Cleaning and Oiling Your Board

     

    1. Wash and dry the cutting board immediately after each use. Don’t ever let your bamboo board soak in the sink or go into the dishwasher. Long exposure to water (and heat in the dishwasher) will warp or crack your board faster than you can say “Oops.” Instead, wash your board with some warm water and soap, rinse it, and dry it completely with a towel. Stand the board vertically on its side to dry, or lean it in an open-air dish rack.

    2. To season, put about ½ cup of food-grade mineral oil in a saucepan, and warm it on the stove. You don’t need it hot—just warm enough to get into the pores of the bamboo. Pour the oil onto your dry cutting board and rub in a circular motion (like Karate Kid) with a clean cloth. Make sure you oil all sides of your cutting board; the mineral oil acts as a hydrator and a barrier for the bamboo, giving it some necessary moisture while keeping excess water out.

    3. Use lemon juice or baking soda if your board develops any weird stains or smells. Sprinkle some juice or powder over the spot, then scrub it with a damp, warm rag. Afterward, your board should smell fresh and look clean once more.

     

    Keep in Mind

     

    •You will need to oil your board regularly to keep up the shine and water-proofing. About once a month is a good schedule to keep; however, if you’re a cooking enthusiast who’s breaking out your board a few times a day, you may want to up the frequency to every two weeks.

    •Bamboo needs a certain amount of moisture to keep from splitting and cracking. You don't want to use a cleaning product that will dry out the board like bleach or rubbing alcohol.

    •Never use cooking oils to season your board, as these will turn rancid.

    For a quick look at which products are okay for your bamboo and which are not, check out the infographic below:

  • How to Hunt with Kids (Without Going Insane)

    A family hunting trip is one of those ideas that sounds wonderful in theory. But then you find yourself wiping melted marshmallow out of your daughter’s hair and wrestling your son into the tent at bedtime, and you question why you ever planned this trip in the first place. Unless, of course, you have a plan. Following these four rules for family hunting trips will keep your kids happy and your sanity intact—there’s even a chance you’ll build some memories along the way.

     

    Rule #1: Stay Warm

      • ● Bring lots of extra warm clothes. Kids can find a way to get soaking wet in the middle of a desert—be prepared with a replacement outfit or two.

     

    • ● Cold hands and cold feet are the formula for a miserable outdoor experience. High quality footwear, gloves, and hand warmers are a must.

     

    • ● There’s nothing better than a campfire at the end of the day. Make sure you’ve got all the gear you need to have a warm fire—firewood, lighter fluid, matches, kindling, etc. Be sure to check on your campsite’s rules and restrictions to see if you are allowed to have a fire. A propane fire pit is a great option for fire-restricted areas.

     

    • ● A good night’s sleep starts with a warm sleeping bag. You’ll want to err on the side of being too warm with your sleeping pads and bags. That means bringing a 0° F sleeping bag rather than a 30° F bag when it’s 25° F outside. Cheap sleeping bags that are only meant for summer sleepovers aren’t going to cut it for late season camping when it’s cold outside.

     

    Use a propane fire pit when your campsite has fire restrictions

    Rule #2: Stay Dry

      • ● The forecast might say it’s supposed to be sunny all weekend; but if this hunting trip is anything like your other family outings, it will inevitably cloud over and start raining or snowing. You can’t avoid it, so you’ll need to prepare for it. Ponchos are inexpensive, versatile, and useful—more than worth the few bucks it costs to buy some for your family.

     

    • ● You don’t want to wait until a storm hits to realize there’s a leak in your tent. Double or triple check that your tent is waterproof before taking off for the weekend. A high quality tent may be a little more expensive than what you can find on the bargain shelf, but you’ll be glad for the investment when your kids are warm and dry during bad weather.

     

    • ● If you’re tight on space inside the tent, bring a pop-up awning. This is the perfect place to wait out a passing shower without cramming together like sardines—especially with antsy kids on your hands.

     

    Rule #3: Have Fun First

    If you have smaller children who aren’t old enough for their own hunting licenses, you need to make sure to involve them in other parts of the hunting experience. Point out game trails, animal tracks, fresh signs, and different animal noises.  You can even ask them to help follow a trail and see where it leads. Just remember: if it is fun for them when they’re young, they will be more interested in coming back to hunt with you in the future.

      • ● Plan activities for the slower hours of the day. Everyone knows hunting is the best early in the morning and late in the evening, so fill those empty afternoons with something else. Bring a BB gun or sling shot for target practice with empty soda cans; take a few fishing rods if there is a pond or river nearby. Even something as simple as a pocket knife and carving stick can create turn into amazing memories.

     

    • ● Kids have limited energy and limited attention spans. So keep the trip short. Don’t plan a 10-day hunt for your whole family if your kids will get bored after three. Additionally, you’ll want to keep the hunting hours on the short side too. It’s okay to wake up a little later and head back to camp a little earlier if it will keep your kids happy.

     

    • ● Be prepared to eat tag soup. If filling your tag is your priority, then maybe bring your family along on the next trip. Your focus should be creating a positive experience that your children will remember and want to repeat in the future. A hunter who’s stressed about filling his or her once-in-a-lifetime tag doesn’t make for the best company. Be there for the little moments that make incredible memories—not just the harvest at the end.
    It's all about the little moments in nature with your kids

    Rule #4: Eat Well

    You don’t have to sacrifice good food just because you are camping.  Breakfast cereal and cold cuts aren’t going to hit the spot after a long day in nature. Plan quality meals that will fill your bellies and be fun to cook. Your camp stove and other outdoor cooking gear will make or break this part of your trip. Whether you need to grill, bake, boil, fry, smoke, or barbecue something in the outdoors, Camp Chef has what you need to eat well around the campfire. Try these recipes with your whole family.

      • ● Breakfast burritos: Breakfast doesn’t get much quicker and easier than this. Tortillas, eggs, sausage, onions, salsa, cheese, hash browns, and a good griddle are all you really need.

     

    • ● Pancakes, eggs, and bacon are perfect for griddle cooking and a crowd favorite. A hearty breakfast like this before a long day of hunting is just what your family needs.

     

    • ● Hobo dinners: Build a fire, fill a foil pouch with whatever ingredients you want, and lay near the coals to cook. Try a combination of hamburger, carrots, onions, and potatoes, or add your own unique ingredients. Just make sure to bring some heavy duty gloves and a shovel to get your meal back out of the fire.

     

    • ● Hotdogs are always great over the fire. You can bring brats for the adults and hotdogs for the kids. As a side, wrap some corn on the cob in foil and throw it in the fire.

     

    • ● S’mores: What family camping trip could be complete without s’mores? Check out some of our unique s’more recipes or stick with the classic.

     

    • ● Hot chocolate and hot coffee: A warm thermos of hot chocolate or coffee on a cold morning will warm up tiny hands and give you an extra 30 minutes of hunting while you wait for your quarry to appear.

     

    Just because you're camping doesn't mean you can't eat great food
  • What Can You Cook on a Pellet Grill?

    8 Pellet Grill Recipes You Have to Try on Your SmokePro

     

    You may have heard of pellet grills and wondered what all the hype is about. It’s just a grill, right? What can you cook on a pellet grill that you can’t on a propane grill? Plenty, my friend. In fact, there are a few foods you simply haven’t experienced unless you’ve cooked them on a SmokePro pellet grill. These pellet grill recipes are here to change your life. Or, at least, your taste buds.

     

    Miracle Frozen Chicken

     

    First on our list of what you can cook on your pellet grill is frozen, store-bought chicken. You know that cheap, rubbery kind you have to excavate from out of the frozen aisle? Yeah, that’s it. Well, now you can make a delectable dinner of it every week. Just place the frozen chicken directly onto the grates of your pellet grill, turn the temperature dial to Hi Smoke, and let the smoker do its thing for an hour. When you come back, you’ll want to season the chicken with steak seasoning and bring it to an internal temperature of 165° F (we can help you measure the internal temp). If you plan to finish it off with a sear, you can transfer it to your sear box when it reaches 130° F. Either way, you will have turned border-line inedible chicken into a tender, flavorful piece of protein.

     

    Competition BBQ Chicken

     

    If you’re looking to upgrade from frozen chicken, this chicken recipe is the way to go. The total time to make it, start to finish, is only 30-45 minutes. You could be looking at a prize-winning dinner in no time.

     

     

    Dang Good Burgers

     

    What can you cook on a pellet grill? A dang good burger. I know what you’re thinking: burgers and propane grills go together like cheesy potatoes and Dutch ovens. But the added wood-fired and smoky flavors you get from a pellet grill will give you a burger unlike any other you’ve tasted before. There are two approaches to how to cook your burgers on a pellet grill.

     

    Heat First, Smoke Later

    First crank the pellet grill to high and let it warm up for 10 minutes. Cook your burgers on that setting for 4 minutes on each side, then finish up on the High Smoke setting to slowly smoke it to your desired temperature. You won’t get the same seared finish that you might on a propane grill, but you’ll be too busy enjoying the smoky flavor to notice.

     

    Reverse Sear

    If you need a good sear to fall in love with a burger, you can use the SmokePro sear box for the reverse sear method. You begin with the burgers on medium heat in the pellet grill—about 275° F—to give the meat two layers of smoky and wood-fired flavor. You’ll also want to switch on your sear box to medium and let it heat up for 5 minutes. I’ve found that medium is hot enough for the kind of sear I like, but the unit can heat up to 900° F. Once the burgers start to sweat a bit, I like to move them to the sear box. Leave them for 1 minute, rotate 90° for 1 minute, then flip and do the same on the other side. For me, the combination of the seared texture and the wood and smoke flavors is hands down the best way to cook a burger.

     

    Tender Pulled Pork

     

    This is the best pulled pork recipe I’ve ever tasted. I like to bring my meat up to 205° F so that it just falls apart with a fork. There’s no going wrong with a low-cost, high-volume BBQ meal like this one. And with a pellet grill, it takes almost no effort on your part.

     

     

    Bacon…Need We Say More?

     

    No recipe needed for this one. Just buy bacon, throw some Competition Blend pellets into the hopper, and experience the miracle of pellet grill bacon. Low and slow is good, medium heat is good, high heat is good. It’s almost impossible to mess up. If you’ve ever wondered, “What can I cook on a pellet grill?” this should be the first thing you try.

     

    Smoked Pork Ribs

     

    There is no better way to cook ribs than on a pellet grill. Period. Don’t believe me? Try this incredible ribs recipe this weekend and taste it for yourself.

     

     

    No-Brainer Brisket

     

    Of all the cuts of meat, brisket is among the most intimidating to cook. There’s trimming, wrapping, rubbing, and then hoping it doesn’t turn out dry and disappointing. I’m nowhere near a pit master, but I’ve cooked brisket several times now on my SmokePro, each time with great success. Check out this smoked brisket recipe for your next big barbecue, and keep an eye out for more tips and tricks coming soon.

     

     

    Incredible Apple Pie

     

    So maybe you’re feeling a bit daring, and you want to try something unique. What can you cook on a pellet grill that isn’t meat? Give this classic American dessert a shot. You can use our favorite apple pie recipe or your own, then leave it on your pellet grill to bake. Set the grill to 400° F just like you would a kitchen oven, and that’s it. Don’t worry—it won’t taste smoky. In fact, I suggest using apple pellets for a sweet, Applewood flavor. Your neighbors might give you weird looks as you put your pie on the grill, but it will be worth it.

     

  • Smart Smoke Technology: For Control Freaks and Carefree Cooks Alike

    Our pellet grills are for control freaks—those who love precise numbers and tight temperature ranges. Our pellet grills are also for carefree cooks—those who love stepping away from the grill and relaxing until their food is ready. These two types of outdoor chefs may seem like polar opposites, but there is one thing on which they agree: it’s all about the taste.

     

    It is upon this uniting idea that we developed our Smart Smoke Technology. Now everyone can be happy, no matter what their cooking method.

     

    For the Carefree Cooks

     

    When you’re sitting down for a meal of smoked ribs, you don’t care if your pellet grill was at 220° F or 225°F; you just want to eat a dang good piece of meat. Many of our competitors love to brag about their breakthrough temperature control like it’s the greatest thing since man discovered fire. While a tight temperature range is important, it doesn’t give you the maximum smoky flavor you crave when you slow-smoke food. In order to keep a pellet grill within 5° of a target temperature, the pellet auger must feed a steady stream of pellets into the burn cup. There is a consistent fire, and therefore minimal smoke. What you’ll taste at the end of your cookout is a wood-fired flavor which, while tasty, isn’t the savory smokiness you hoped for.

     

    Now take our Smart Smoke Technology with the Lo Smoke and Hi Smoke settings. On these settings, our pellet grills fluctuate within 10° or 15° from the target temperature. This forces the auger to feed wood pellets into the burn cup less often and in greater quantities, leading to shorter burns and lots of smoke. Our grills produce the optimal amount of smoke for maximum smoky flavor thanks to this technology. Try it out: the taste will speak for itself.

     

    For the Control Freaks

     

    If the idea of temperature fluctuation made your inner control freak a bit anxious, you can relax now. Our Smart Smoke Technology also offers the precision you need for baking, grilling, braising, and every other cooking job. We get it—with some foods, there’s no wiggle room with the temperature. That’s why we’ve included a variety of specific temperature settings from 175°F to 400°F and above. You can set the heat and count on your pellet grill to keep it. Enjoy food cooked to your liking and an excellent wood-fired flavor.

     

    So to both groups—the carefree cooks and the control freaks—we say cook on. Find your style of low-and-slow or careful-and-controlled. Embrace it. Whatever you prefer, the superior flavor of Smart Smoke Technology is for you.

  • What Kind of Tailgater Are You?

    With football season about to kick off, it's time to evaluate your tailgating status. Are you the super fan who has all the best tailgate party gear? Or are you the rookie who's busting out a brand new stove? Find out what kind of tailgate party you run, and we'll give you a few ideas for upgrading it.

  • 8 Ways to Step Up Your Tailgate Party This Weekend

    With football season right around the corner (you can almost hear the kickoff whistle echoing from the stadium), it’s time to haul your tailgating gear out of storage. Chances are you have a trusty stove that’s both portable and powerful, a heavy duty cooler for maximum beer-holding capacity, and a collection of tried-and-true recipes. Or maybe this is your first season, and you’re trying to decide what you need to kick things off with a bang. Whether you’re a newbie or a veteran, you can’t reach MVP status until you’re bringing these items and accessories with you every weekend.

     

    1. Extra bag of chips or pack of drinks

    Obviously, you should plan to bring plenty of food. But take special care and set aside an extra bag of chips or six pack. This inexpensive investment can go miles as a peace offering to your tailgate neighbors, especially if you’re a newcomer. Bring it by their tent when you arrive with no strings attached. You’ll make a few friends—and you’ll have someone to ask for help when you realize that you forgot the mustard.

     

    2. Frozen water bottles

    Filling your cooler with ice is great for cans of soda or beer, but when it comes to keeping your food cold, you need something that won’t create a puddle. You can buy ice packs for this—they’ll stay dry and cold. However, the next-level strategy is to pack your cooler with frozen water bottles. Not only will this keep food cool and dry, you’ll also have a half dozen refreshing waters to drink later that afternoon.

     

    3. Wireless thermometer

    As the party chef, you could find yourself pinned to your stove all day, watching the meat like a helicopter mom. If you’re paranoid about hitting the right temperature, you aren’t leaving yourself any time for fun. And last time we checked, tailgating is all about having a good time. With a wireless thermometer, you can enjoy the party and keep a close eye on your meat at the same time. Set the desired temperature, insert the meat probe, listen for the notification alarm, and dominate at cornhole until it’s time to eat.

     

    peanut butter burger4. Crazy condiments

    Ketchup, mustard, mayo, and relish might be classics, but they aren’t your only options. Don’t be afraid to up your tailgating game with some more…experimental condiments. Spice it up with BBQ sauce, teriyaki, ranch, and more. If you really want to score with your guests, bust out a homemade spread like artichoke pesto sauce or peanut butter sauce (yes, peanut butter). Trust us, your taste buds and tailgating buddies will thank you!

     

    5. Outdoor screen and projector

    You might have a portable TV to watch football games throughout the day; an outdoor movie screen takes that concept to the next level of awesome. You’ll need to bring a power source for your projector, but from there it’s a simple set up. Imagine all your favorite games showing on the big screen instead of your tiny computer. You’ll be the star of the parking lot.

     

    6. First Aid Kit

    Okay, okay. This might seem like a no-brainer, but the tailgating pros always put safety first. You never know when you might need some burn ointment after a hot splash of grease or a bandage after flag football gets too competitive.

     

    7. Hand-Washing Station

    Once the eating, drinking, playing, and high-fiving is done, you will want to be able to wash and dry your hands. Hand sanitizer is a quick, easy solution. But you can take it a step further with a bottle of hand soap and a 5-gallon beverage cooler as a wash station. Leave a large bucket underneath (or your dirty dishes tote, see below) to catch the soapy water, and voila! You have yourself a full tailgate hand-washing station. For added convenience, hook a paper towel rack onto your stove or grill.

     

    8. Empty plastic tote or collapsible garbage can

    When the burgers are eaten and the beers are gone, you only want to think about one thing: winning the big game. What you don’t want to think about is washing a pile of dirty spatulas, knives, trays, cutting boards, plates, and other scattered dishes. Cue the empty tub: you can pile everything into it without getting your car dirty, then forget about it until after the game. If you don’t have a spare tote, try using a collapsible garbage can like this one.  Either way, the idea is the same: clean-up in a snap.

    Tailgating with Camp Chef

    Do you have some hacks of your own? Let us know in the comments below or share on social media how you’ve taken your tailgating game to pro status.

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