Your search ' rio grande wood fire pit ' did not match any products.
Showing results using some of your search terms ' rio grande wood fire pit '

2 Item(s)
Show per page
Sort By

Del Rio Fire Pit


Artisan Pizza Oven 60 Accessory


Blog Results

  • How to Hunt with Kids (Without Going Insane)

    A family hunting trip is one of those ideas that sounds wonderful in theory. But then you find yourself wiping melted marshmallow out of your daughter’s hair and wrestling your son into the tent at bedtime, and you question why you ever planned this trip in the first place. Unless, of course, you have a plan. Following these four rules for family hunting trips will keep your kids happy and your sanity intact—there’s even a chance you’ll build some memories along the way.


    Rule #1: Stay Warm

      • ● Bring lots of extra warm clothes. Kids can find a way to get soaking wet in the middle of a desert—be prepared with a replacement outfit or two.


    • ● Cold hands and cold feet are the formula for a miserable outdoor experience. High quality footwear, gloves, and hand warmers are a must.


    • ● There’s nothing better than a campfire at the end of the day. Make sure you’ve got all the gear you need to have a warm fire—firewood, lighter fluid, matches, kindling, etc. Be sure to check on your campsite’s rules and restrictions to see if you are allowed to have a fire. A propane fire pit is a great option for fire-restricted areas.


    • ● A good night’s sleep starts with a warm sleeping bag. You’ll want to err on the side of being too warm with your sleeping pads and bags. That means bringing a 0° F sleeping bag rather than a 30° F bag when it’s 25° F outside. Cheap sleeping bags that are only meant for summer sleepovers aren’t going to cut it for late season camping when it’s cold outside.


    Use a propane fire pit when your campsite has fire restrictions

    Rule #2: Stay Dry

      • ● The forecast might say it’s supposed to be sunny all weekend; but if this hunting trip is anything like your other family outings, it will inevitably cloud over and start raining or snowing. You can’t avoid it, so you’ll need to prepare for it. Ponchos are inexpensive, versatile, and useful—more than worth the few bucks it costs to buy some for your family.


    • ● You don’t want to wait until a storm hits to realize there’s a leak in your tent. Double or triple check that your tent is waterproof before taking off for the weekend. A high quality tent may be a little more expensive than what you can find on the bargain shelf, but you’ll be glad for the investment when your kids are warm and dry during bad weather.


    • ● If you’re tight on space inside the tent, bring a pop-up awning. This is the perfect place to wait out a passing shower without cramming together like sardines—especially with antsy kids on your hands.


    Rule #3: Have Fun First

    If you have smaller children who aren’t old enough for their own hunting licenses, you need to make sure to involve them in other parts of the hunting experience. Point out game trails, animal tracks, fresh signs, and different animal noises.  You can even ask them to help follow a trail and see where it leads. Just remember: if it is fun for them when they’re young, they will be more interested in coming back to hunt with you in the future.

      • ● Plan activities for the slower hours of the day. Everyone knows hunting is the best early in the morning and late in the evening, so fill those empty afternoons with something else. Bring a BB gun or sling shot for target practice with empty soda cans; take a few fishing rods if there is a pond or river nearby. Even something as simple as a pocket knife and carving stick can create turn into amazing memories.


    • ● Kids have limited energy and limited attention spans. So keep the trip short. Don’t plan a 10-day hunt for your whole family if your kids will get bored after three. Additionally, you’ll want to keep the hunting hours on the short side too. It’s okay to wake up a little later and head back to camp a little earlier if it will keep your kids happy.


    • ● Be prepared to eat tag soup. If filling your tag is your priority, then maybe bring your family along on the next trip. Your focus should be creating a positive experience that your children will remember and want to repeat in the future. A hunter who’s stressed about filling his or her once-in-a-lifetime tag doesn’t make for the best company. Be there for the little moments that make incredible memories—not just the harvest at the end.
    It's all about the little moments in nature with your kids

    Rule #4: Eat Well

    You don’t have to sacrifice good food just because you are camping.  Breakfast cereal and cold cuts aren’t going to hit the spot after a long day in nature. Plan quality meals that will fill your bellies and be fun to cook. Your camp stove and other outdoor cooking gear will make or break this part of your trip. Whether you need to grill, bake, boil, fry, smoke, or barbecue something in the outdoors, Camp Chef has what you need to eat well around the campfire. Try these recipes with your whole family.

      • ● Breakfast burritos: Breakfast doesn’t get much quicker and easier than this. Tortillas, eggs, sausage, onions, salsa, cheese, hash browns, and a good griddle are all you really need.


    • ● Pancakes, eggs, and bacon are perfect for griddle cooking and a crowd favorite. A hearty breakfast like this before a long day of hunting is just what your family needs.


    • ● Hobo dinners: Build a fire, fill a foil pouch with whatever ingredients you want, and lay near the coals to cook. Try a combination of hamburger, carrots, onions, and potatoes, or add your own unique ingredients. Just make sure to bring some heavy duty gloves and a shovel to get your meal back out of the fire.


    • ● Hotdogs are always great over the fire. You can bring brats for the adults and hotdogs for the kids. As a side, wrap some corn on the cob in foil and throw it in the fire.


    • ● S’mores: What family camping trip could be complete without s’mores? Check out some of our unique s’more recipes or stick with the classic.


    • ● Hot chocolate and hot coffee: A warm thermos of hot chocolate or coffee on a cold morning will warm up tiny hands and give you an extra 30 minutes of hunting while you wait for your quarry to appear.


    Just because you're camping doesn't mean you can't eat great food
  • What Can You Cook on a Pellet Grill?

    8 Pellet Grill Recipes You Have to Try on Your SmokePro


    You may have heard of pellet grills and wondered what all the hype is about. It’s just a grill, right? What can you cook on a pellet grill that you can’t on a propane grill? Plenty, my friend. In fact, there are a few foods you simply haven’t experienced unless you’ve cooked them on a SmokePro pellet grill. These pellet grill recipes are here to change your life. Or, at least, your taste buds.


    Miracle Frozen Chicken


    First on our list of what you can cook on your pellet grill is frozen, store-bought chicken. You know that cheap, rubbery kind you have to excavate from out of the frozen aisle? Yeah, that’s it. Well, now you can make a delectable dinner of it every week. Just place the frozen chicken directly onto the grates of your pellet grill, turn the temperature dial to Hi Smoke, and let the smoker do its thing for an hour. When you come back, you’ll want to season the chicken with steak seasoning and bring it to an internal temperature of 165° F (we can help you measure the internal temp). If you plan to finish it off with a sear, you can transfer it to your sear box when it reaches 130° F. Either way, you will have turned border-line inedible chicken into a tender, flavorful piece of protein.


    Competition BBQ Chicken


    If you’re looking to upgrade from frozen chicken, this chicken recipe is the way to go. The total time to make it, start to finish, is only 30-45 minutes. You could be looking at a prize-winning dinner in no time.



    Dang Good Burgers


    What can you cook on a pellet grill? A dang good burger. I know what you’re thinking: burgers and propane grills go together like cheesy potatoes and Dutch ovens. But the added wood-fired and smoky flavors you get from a pellet grill will give you a burger unlike any other you’ve tasted before. There are two approaches to how to cook your burgers on a pellet grill.


    Heat First, Smoke Later

    First crank the pellet grill to high and let it warm up for 10 minutes. Cook your burgers on that setting for 4 minutes on each side, then finish up on the High Smoke setting to slowly smoke it to your desired temperature. You won’t get the same seared finish that you might on a propane grill, but you’ll be too busy enjoying the smoky flavor to notice.


    Reverse Sear

    If you need a good sear to fall in love with a burger, you can use the SmokePro sear box for the reverse sear method. You begin with the burgers on medium heat in the pellet grill—about 275° F—to give the meat two layers of smoky and wood-fired flavor. You’ll also want to switch on your sear box to medium and let it heat up for 5 minutes. I’ve found that medium is hot enough for the kind of sear I like, but the unit can heat up to 900° F. Once the burgers start to sweat a bit, I like to move them to the sear box. Leave them for 1 minute, rotate 90° for 1 minute, then flip and do the same on the other side. For me, the combination of the seared texture and the wood and smoke flavors is hands down the best way to cook a burger.


    Tender Pulled Pork


    This is the best pulled pork recipe I’ve ever tasted. I like to bring my meat up to 205° F so that it just falls apart with a fork. There’s no going wrong with a low-cost, high-volume BBQ meal like this one. And with a pellet grill, it takes almost no effort on your part.



    Bacon…Need We Say More?


    No recipe needed for this one. Just buy bacon, throw some Competition Blend pellets into the hopper, and experience the miracle of pellet grill bacon. Low and slow is good, medium heat is good, high heat is good. It’s almost impossible to mess up. If you’ve ever wondered, “What can I cook on a pellet grill?” this should be the first thing you try.


    Smoked Pork Ribs


    There is no better way to cook ribs than on a pellet grill. Period. Don’t believe me? Try this incredible ribs recipe this weekend and taste it for yourself.



    No-Brainer Brisket


    Of all the cuts of meat, brisket is among the most intimidating to cook. There’s trimming, wrapping, rubbing, and then hoping it doesn’t turn out dry and disappointing. I’m nowhere near a pit master, but I’ve cooked brisket several times now on my SmokePro, each time with great success. Check out this smoked brisket recipe for your next big barbecue, and keep an eye out for more tips and tricks coming soon.



    Incredible Apple Pie


    So maybe you’re feeling a bit daring, and you want to try something unique. What can you cook on a pellet grill that isn’t meat? Give this classic American dessert a shot. You can use our favorite apple pie recipe or your own, then leave it on your pellet grill to bake. Set the grill to 400° F just like you would a kitchen oven, and that’s it. Don’t worry—it won’t taste smoky. In fact, I suggest using apple pellets for a sweet, Applewood flavor. Your neighbors might give you weird looks as you put your pie on the grill, but it will be worth it.


  • Sportsman's News Shows How to "Eat Like a King in the Great Outdoors"

    People who camp with me always remark on one thing; we eat very well. Camping is my time to really go all out for feeding the masses. From grilling wild game over an open fire, to baking in a Dutch oven, I really enjoy preparing meals that really only can be cooked in the outdoors.
  • Del Rio Firepit - Chef Kurt

    Outdoor Chef Kurt loves to be outside. He has just started using the Camp Chef propane fire ring! With 60,000 BTU’s his outdoor patio experience has reached a whole new level.

4 Item(s)