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  • How to Care for Your Griddle

    Griddle Care & Maintenance

    Most of our professional griddles come with a True-Seasoned Finish, just like all of our cast iron. To keep this finish in tip-top condition, your griddle needs a little TLC every now and then. By following the guide below, you will help keep your griddle clean, prevent rust, and build up the glass-like finish to keep food from sticking.

    Temperature Management

    Giving your griddle time to pre-heat properly will ensure you’re getting the best cooking performance possible. Start by setting your heat to Medium or Med-Low for about 5 minutes. This should bring the griddle surface temperature to about 350°-400° F, depending on the weather and environment. Then turn the heat to Med-Low or Low for 2-3 minutes for uniform heat across the entire cooking surface. The steel heats up quickly but cools slowly, so you’ll have plenty of heat to work with even after you turn down the burners. You’re ready to get cooking.

    Managing the heat on your griddle is important to prevent any possible damage. While the steel is strong and durable, you should only use Low or Medium heat settings. This is especially important if you want to use different heat settings on a large griddle that covers multiple burners. You have the capability to warm a tortilla on one side and cook a fajita mix on the other, but you want to keep both settings on Medium or lower.


    After each use, clean off any food particles while the griddle is still warm. You might want to use a metal spatula or chain mail scrubber to remove stubborn bits. Then wash with hot water, mild dish soap (never use abrasive detergent), or our Cast Iron Cleaner. Rinse and dry thoroughly. Never scour or use a dishwasher, as this could chip the nice, seasoned finish you’re going for.


    Once your griddle is clean, slowly warm it up again on your stove. Apply a thin layer of Cast Iron Conditioner or cooking oil. We recommend Cast Iron Conditioner because it has a palm oil base, which boasts a longer shelf life than any other natural oil. Be sure that the entire surface, including all corners, have been coated thoroughly. This will ensure that all surfaces of your cookware will be properly seasoned. This finish helps protect the steel or cast iron from rust and contributes to a nonstick cooking surface. Let your griddle cool, then wipe off excess conditioner or oil with a clean cloth.


    After your griddle is clean, dry, and seasoned, you will need to store it in a dry, clean area. You can use one of our carry bags, specifically designed to hold your professional griddle. If you store it in one of these bags long-term, leave the zipper open 2-4 inches so the metal doesn’t “sweat.” This will prevent rusting.

    Pro Tips

    • • Be sure that your griddle is level before cooking, so that any juices or grease will drain properly. To test your griddle’s angle, pour a cup of water on the corner farthest from the grease drain and see where it flows.
    • • Use our grease cup accessory for an easy clean-up.
    • • If you need to adjust the heat on your griddle, do so a little at a time. The metal will heat quickly and cool slowly.
    • • Lightly oil the griddle before each use while it’s heating up. You can use Camp Chef Conditioner or cooking oil.
    • • The steel will continue to antique and darken with each use—it’s okay for it to accumulate a patina.
    • • Rusty, metallic tastes or discolored foods are signs of inadequate seasoning or may result from cooking heavily acidic foods. If this occurs, wash the griddle thoroughly and re-season.
    • • Check out all the cooking accessories we offer to go along with your griddle. You’ll be cooking like a pro in no time.


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    Griddle Clean & Care
  • How to Care for Your New Bamboo Cutting Board

    In case you haven’t heard, bamboo cutting boards are the next big kitchen accessory. Bamboo is a sustainable, fast-growing resource, and it is tougher than many woods on the market today. The grass (technically bamboo isn’t a wood) is also gentler with your knives and a real beauty on the counter top. Basically, it’s everything you’d want in a cutting board.


    At Camp Chef, we know a good kitchen tool when we see one. So we brought you the cutting board of all cutting boards—26 inches of solid bamboo. You can fit steaks, whole chicken, brisket, roast, and more on this board without breaking a sweat. It’s also perfect for transporting your prep station from the kitchen to the patio in one trip. Check it out; go ahead, we’ll wait.


    Now that we’ve taken care of that, you need to know how to care for your new bamboo cutting board, right?


    The bad news is that bamboo cutting boards need the same kind of TLC that traditional wooden cutting boards do; the good news is that they’ll last a lot longer than any other board if you treat them right.


    Bamboo cutting board with brisket

    Cleaning and Oiling Your Board


    1. Wash and dry the cutting board immediately after each use. Don’t ever let your bamboo board soak in the sink or go into the dishwasher. Long exposure to water (and heat in the dishwasher) will warp or crack your board faster than you can say “Oops.” Instead, wash your board with some warm water and soap, rinse it, and dry it completely with a towel. Stand the board vertically on its side to dry, or lean it in an open-air dish rack.

    2. To season, put about ½ cup of food-grade mineral oil in a saucepan, and warm it on the stove. You don’t need it hot—just warm enough to get into the pores of the bamboo. Pour the oil onto your dry cutting board and rub in a circular motion (like Karate Kid) with a clean cloth. Make sure you oil all sides of your cutting board; the mineral oil acts as a hydrator and a barrier for the bamboo, giving it some necessary moisture while keeping excess water out.

    3. Use lemon juice or baking soda if your board develops any weird stains or smells. Sprinkle some juice or powder over the spot, then scrub it with a damp, warm rag. Afterward, your board should smell fresh and look clean once more.


    Keep in Mind


    •You will need to oil your board regularly to keep up the shine and water-proofing. About once a month is a good schedule to keep; however, if you’re a cooking enthusiast who’s breaking out your board a few times a day, you may want to up the frequency to every two weeks.

    •Bamboo needs a certain amount of moisture to keep from splitting and cracking. You don't want to use a cleaning product that will dry out the board like bleach or rubbing alcohol.

    •Never use cooking oils to season your board, as these will turn rancid.

    For a quick look at which products are okay for your bamboo and which are not, check out the infographic below:

  • Spring Cleaning: Part One

    It’s that time of year again. People all across America will start the annual “spring cleaning” in their homes, garages and back patios. For many (hopefully this includes you) it means pulling out the camping gear that has been in hibernation since late fall. If your gear hasn’t been hibernating hopefully that means you have been putting it to good use.

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