Your search ' activities hunting fishing 8 1' did not match any products.
Showing results using some of your search terms ' activities hunting fishing 8 1'

1 Item(s)
Show per page
Sort By

Stainless Steel Coffee Pot 28 Cup


Blog Results

  • Make the Most of Your Hunt Harvest

    You came. You shot. You conquered. Congratulations on a successful hunting trip this year. Whether you’re bringing home some big game, a few waterfowls, or a variety of upland game birds, you should celebrate over the dinner table. We have a few recipe ideas for you to make the most of your harvest. Give these meals a shot and let us know what your favorite harvest recipes are.  

    How to Cook Elk: Stuffed Venison Backstrap


    This is the perfect recipe for bringing home some big game like elk or whitetail deer. You probably already know how delicious fresh venison is; what you might not know is how much more delicious it is when you pair it with cream cheese, bacon, mushrooms, and garlic. YES. PLEASE. Check out the recipe here.


    Stuffed venison backstrap on a grill  

    How to Cook Duck: Duck & Pickled Onion Tacos

    Okay, so this recipe might not have the most appetizing title, but it is worth a taste. The duck rub, made from Camp Chef's Mango Chipotle seasoning, is packed with flavor, and the pickled red onions add an incredible tang to the taco. Trust us, you won't regret testing this recipe out for yourself.

      You'll need...

    • -2-4 duck breasts
    • -Corn tortillas
    • -1/4 cup Camp Chef Mango Chipotle Rub
    • -1 T fresh coffee grounds
    • -1 T tequila
    • -1 lime (juiced)
    • -1 T fresh cilantro
    • -1 red onion, thinly sliced
    • -1 cup water
    • -1/3 cup apple cider vinegar
    • -Salt
    • -Jalapeños (optional)
    • -Queso blanco (optional)

      Duck tacos with jalapeno and pickled red onions

    In a small bowl, mix all ingredients together to make a paste. Score the skin on each duck breast every ½ inch and add to paste. Be sure to completely cover each breast. Let marinade for 30-45 minutes.

    Add red onion, water, apple cider vinegar and salt to 10- or 12-inch cast iron skillet. Simmer over low heat for 20-30 minutes.

    Grill duck breasts skin side down over high heat. Grill for 1 to 2 minutes on each side or until medium rare. Be sure not to overcook.

    When done, thinly slice breasts, place on corn tortilla, and top with onions. Add jalapeños and queso blanco if desired.

    Watch the video below for a walkthrough of the recipe:


    How to Cook Pheasant: Herb Roasted Pheasant Breasts tastes like chicken, only better. This recipe will keep your bird tender and tasty. After all, it's hard to go wrong with a classic combination of fresh herbs like basil, rosemary, oregano, and more. Try cooking it on the pellet grill for even more flavor.   You'll need...

    • -4-6 pheasant breasts
    • -2 minced garlic cloves
    • -1 cup fresh herbs (basil, sage, rosemary, oregano, etc.)
    • -1/2 cup cooked bacon, diced
    • -1 whole lemon, diced, including skin
    • -Salt
    • -Pepper

      Herb roasted pheasant

    Preheat pellet grill to 400°.

    In a small bowl combine garlic, herbs, bacon and lemon. Rub each pheasant breast with mixture and place in a lightly oiled Square Dutch Oven.

    Bake in pellet grill with lid off for 15 to 20 minutes or until breasts are just cooked. Time and temperature will vary depending size of pheasant breast.

    Serve with wild rice or potatoes and mix of veggies.

  • How to Hunt with Kids (Without Going Insane)

    A family hunting trip is one of those ideas that sounds wonderful in theory. But then you find yourself wiping melted marshmallow out of your daughter’s hair and wrestling your son into the tent at bedtime, and you question why you ever planned this trip in the first place. Unless, of course, you have a plan. Following these four rules for family hunting trips will keep your kids happy and your sanity intact—there’s even a chance you’ll build some memories along the way.


    Rule #1: Stay Warm

      • ● Bring lots of extra warm clothes. Kids can find a way to get soaking wet in the middle of a desert—be prepared with a replacement outfit or two.


    • ● Cold hands and cold feet are the formula for a miserable outdoor experience. High quality footwear, gloves, and hand warmers are a must.


    • ● There’s nothing better than a campfire at the end of the day. Make sure you’ve got all the gear you need to have a warm fire—firewood, lighter fluid, matches, kindling, etc. Be sure to check on your campsite’s rules and restrictions to see if you are allowed to have a fire. A propane fire pit is a great option for fire-restricted areas.


    • ● A good night’s sleep starts with a warm sleeping bag. You’ll want to err on the side of being too warm with your sleeping pads and bags. That means bringing a 0° F sleeping bag rather than a 30° F bag when it’s 25° F outside. Cheap sleeping bags that are only meant for summer sleepovers aren’t going to cut it for late season camping when it’s cold outside.


    Use a propane fire pit when your campsite has fire restrictions

    Rule #2: Stay Dry

      • ● The forecast might say it’s supposed to be sunny all weekend; but if this hunting trip is anything like your other family outings, it will inevitably cloud over and start raining or snowing. You can’t avoid it, so you’ll need to prepare for it. Ponchos are inexpensive, versatile, and useful—more than worth the few bucks it costs to buy some for your family.


    • ● You don’t want to wait until a storm hits to realize there’s a leak in your tent. Double or triple check that your tent is waterproof before taking off for the weekend. A high quality tent may be a little more expensive than what you can find on the bargain shelf, but you’ll be glad for the investment when your kids are warm and dry during bad weather.


    • ● If you’re tight on space inside the tent, bring a pop-up awning. This is the perfect place to wait out a passing shower without cramming together like sardines—especially with antsy kids on your hands.


    Rule #3: Have Fun First

    If you have smaller children who aren’t old enough for their own hunting licenses, you need to make sure to involve them in other parts of the hunting experience. Point out game trails, animal tracks, fresh signs, and different animal noises.  You can even ask them to help follow a trail and see where it leads. Just remember: if it is fun for them when they’re young, they will be more interested in coming back to hunt with you in the future.

      • ● Plan activities for the slower hours of the day. Everyone knows hunting is the best early in the morning and late in the evening, so fill those empty afternoons with something else. Bring a BB gun or sling shot for target practice with empty soda cans; take a few fishing rods if there is a pond or river nearby. Even something as simple as a pocket knife and carving stick can create turn into amazing memories.


    • ● Kids have limited energy and limited attention spans. So keep the trip short. Don’t plan a 10-day hunt for your whole family if your kids will get bored after three. Additionally, you’ll want to keep the hunting hours on the short side too. It’s okay to wake up a little later and head back to camp a little earlier if it will keep your kids happy.


    • ● Be prepared to eat tag soup. If filling your tag is your priority, then maybe bring your family along on the next trip. Your focus should be creating a positive experience that your children will remember and want to repeat in the future. A hunter who’s stressed about filling his or her once-in-a-lifetime tag doesn’t make for the best company. Be there for the little moments that make incredible memories—not just the harvest at the end.
    It's all about the little moments in nature with your kids

    Rule #4: Eat Well

    You don’t have to sacrifice good food just because you are camping.  Breakfast cereal and cold cuts aren’t going to hit the spot after a long day in nature. Plan quality meals that will fill your bellies and be fun to cook. Your camp stove and other outdoor cooking gear will make or break this part of your trip. Whether you need to grill, bake, boil, fry, smoke, or barbecue something in the outdoors, Camp Chef has what you need to eat well around the campfire. Try these recipes with your whole family.

      • ● Breakfast burritos: Breakfast doesn’t get much quicker and easier than this. Tortillas, eggs, sausage, onions, salsa, cheese, hash browns, and a good griddle are all you really need.


    • ● Pancakes, eggs, and bacon are perfect for griddle cooking and a crowd favorite. A hearty breakfast like this before a long day of hunting is just what your family needs.


    • ● Hobo dinners: Build a fire, fill a foil pouch with whatever ingredients you want, and lay near the coals to cook. Try a combination of hamburger, carrots, onions, and potatoes, or add your own unique ingredients. Just make sure to bring some heavy duty gloves and a shovel to get your meal back out of the fire.


    • ● Hotdogs are always great over the fire. You can bring brats for the adults and hotdogs for the kids. As a side, wrap some corn on the cob in foil and throw it in the fire.


    • ● S’mores: What family camping trip could be complete without s’mores? Check out some of our unique s’more recipes or stick with the classic.


    • ● Hot chocolate and hot coffee: A warm thermos of hot chocolate or coffee on a cold morning will warm up tiny hands and give you an extra 30 minutes of hunting while you wait for your quarry to appear.


    Just because you're camping doesn't mean you can't eat great food
  • SHOT Show 2016: A Better Way

    The Shooting, Hunting, and Outdoor Trade Show and Conference - or SHOT Show as it is more commonly known - occurs in January each year. For the past several years, we have been one of the more than 1,600 exhibitors at SHOT. It's a frenzy of media and industry professionals looking at the latest and greatest gear in the shooting, hunting and outdoor trade. It has been an amazing show for us to attend and this year was no exception. One of the highlights was the write-up on Camp Chef in the SHOT Daily publication. Click the image below to read the full PDF document.

    SHOT Show 2016
  • 2016 Annual Gear Issue - Stryker Stoves

    Each year, Petersen's Hunting releases their Annual Gear Issue. Of the over 200 products they "used & abused", the Camp Chef Stryker Stoves not only were featured but received an Editor's Choice award.
  • Zion's Bank Speaking on Business - Camp Chef

    Recently, Chris Redgrave for Zions Bank Speaking on Business, highlighted Camp Chef. Below is the transcript and a link to listen to the mp3.
  • Petersen's Hunting: Hottest Grills on the Market

    For over two decades we have worked to make cooking outdoors just as enjoyable as the outdoors themselves. To do that we have worked to develop a large array of stoves to keep people cooking at camp, on the back patio, in the duck blind, and while out on the open road.

Items 1 to 6 of 25 total