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An Experiment

An Experiment

I decided that I would make something that I would normally NEVER make. Well, make/taste.  I found one”

Growing up I had a friend from Pennsylvania who loved Scrapple as a child. She always said that you just enjoy it, but NEVER look at the label. I have also heard of it referred to as “everything but the oink”. Is your tummy growling yet??

Here is what Wikipedia had to say about this:

Scrapple, also known by the Pennsylvania Dutch name pon haus,is traditionally a mush of pork scraps and trimmings combined with cornmeal and flour, often buckwheat flour, and spices. The mush is formed into a semi-solid congealed loaf, and slices of the scrapple are then panfried before serving. Scraps of meat left over from butchering, not used or sold elsewhere, were made into scrapple to avoid waste. Scrapple is best known as a regional American food of the Mid-Atlantic states (Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Maryland). Scrapple and pon haus are commonly considered an ethnic food of the Pennsylvania Dutch, including the Mennonites and Amish. Scrapple is found in supermarkets throughout the region in both fresh and frozen refrigerated cases.

 Vegetable Scrapple

Ingredients:

  • 1 onion, chopped fine
  • 1 carrot, chopped fine
  • 1/4 c. peanut butter ( I used a natural peanut butter, sans sugar)
  • 1 t. salt
  • 2 c. hot mush
  • Mush:
  • 2 1/2 c. boiling water
  • 3/4 c. corn meal
  • 1/2 t. salt

Directions:

  1. Cook onion and carrot in boiling, salted water until tender. Drain. Add the corn meal and salt to the 2 1/2 c, boiling water stirring constantly; cook five minutes.
  2. Add the cooked carrot, onion, salt and peanut butter to the hot mush, mix well.
  3. Turn into a loaf pan rinsed in cold water.
  4. Chill until firm. Slice 1/2 inch thick.
  5. Sprinkle with flour and fry brown on both sides in bacon fat. Serve with crisp bacon or Cheese sauce.

Here is it all chilled and dusted with flour:

Verdict: This was not horrible, but not something I think I could get anyone else to try. In fact, I couldn’t get anyone to try it. Truly it tasted like peanut butter polenta. So, with that, experiment, done.

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